Our gender pay gap results 2017

New government legislation requires all companies employing more than 250 people to publish their gender pay gap as of 5 April 2017.

What is the gender pay gap report?

 It summarises the pay gap of a combined workforce, no matter the role, to highlight the average difference in pay between men and women It will now be reported on every year, with businesses reporting on six statistics. 

The gender pay gap results shouldn’t be confused with equal pay. Equal pay is where people are carrying out the same or similar role, or work which is different, but of equal value to the company. We carry out equal pay audits separately and we are confident we do not have any equal pay issues. 

 

The six statistics

Median gender pay gap figure
This identifies the hourly pay of the middle earner for both females and males and looks at the % differential.


Mean gender pay gap figure
This looks at an average of both the female and male wage.  This takes into account the complete spread of hourly pay – this is particularly useful as women are often over-represented at the low earning extreme and men are over-represented at the high earning extreme.


Median gender bonus gap figure
This identifies the middle bonus payment of for both females and males and looks at the % differential.

Mean gender bonus gap figure
This looks at an average of bonus payments for both female and male’s.  


The proportion of men and women in each quartile of the pay structure
This shows the spread of male and female earners across an organisation, helping to show employers where women’s progress might be stalling so they can take action to support their career development.


The gender pay gaps for any bonuses paid out during the year
As there is a significant issue around bonus payments in some sectors, employers are also asked to publish the proportion of male and proportion of female employees that received a bonus during the year.